This series, Of Land  Of Sea studies, is where my focus on many aspects of ocean life and the metaphors that spring from it, meet the land.

I began making from clay and drawing coral after finding two pieces of endangered coral tangled and ultimately destroyed by fishing line. They became a tangible, poignant metaphor for what is at risk in the ocean environment, but also work to connect the man-made with the natural.

The use of the circle in this context can pertain to many objects: a microscope, telescope, porthole or Petri dish; it is the formal element that contains the loosely drawn organic shapes. The lines of cut silver paper, suggest mapped streets, measuring markers or directional lines. The shapes of boats permeate this series from my work of the last two years, ever mindful of its presence and still a perfect metaphor of the human psyche.

In my art practice I am thoughtful about materials used and what they may say about the work being produced. I chose to draw on reclaimed OSB (particle board used for building houses) realizing the use of such a matrix provides depth of meaning to the work given the etymology of the word Ecology: Oikos, from the Greek for House and logos for knowledge. Our environment, our home, our knowing.

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Size (Inches/centimetres) & prices
Click on image to see painting number

Of Land Of Sea #8-24 | 12 x 12/ 30 x 30    $600
Of Land Of Sea #25 | 12 x 24/30 x 61    $1000
Of Land Of Sea #1-7 | 24 x 24/61 x 61    $1350
Of Land Of Sea #26 | 36 x 36/91 x 91    $2900
Of Land Of Sea #27 | 36 x 48/91 x 122    $3600

A portion of the sales from this series will go to the Heiltsuk Nation to aid oil spill clean up

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Each piece was cut and surfaced with PolyFil then sanded. A coat of clear and regular gesso was mixed then painted over the surface. This was sanded then repeated. The drawings are sealed with Liquitex pouring liquid and mat medium.  All pieces except Of Land, OF Sea #1, are unframed however can be finished with wood veneer trim on the sides if the client desires.

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Paintings documented by Byron Dauncey, studio photos by the artist

Commissioned drawings considered